GBA

I wanted to become a Pharmacist – Jesugbogo Enis

Best Graduating Student of Wesley University Ondo 2020/2021 session--Jesugbogo Enis

Wesley University Ondo, an institution founded in 2007  held its 9th and 10th convocation ceremony on the 11th of June 2022 to award degrees to its graduates and, of course, honour the overall best graduating student from the 2020/2021 session, Jesugbogo Enis.

Let us meet Jesugbogo Enis.

GBA: Can we get to know you?

Guest: I am Jesugbogo Enis. I’m goal-oriented and always motivated to achieve those goals. I love reading; some of my mates call me a bookworm. I love writing and singing too. Cooking is not my hobby but it’s something every lady has to learn right? My best food is yam and eggs. Asides from all this, more importantly, Jesugbogo is a child of God.

GBA: What are your interests?

Guest: I enjoy reading, singing, writing, and talking, but only if I’m in the midst of my friends or having a serious conversation, otherwise I prefer to be quiet. I love taking on new challenges specifically when it requires me to think.

GBA: What course did you study?

Guest: I studied Industrial Chemistry.

GBA: Was it always your intention to study Industrial Chemistry?

No, it was not my intention to study Industrial Chemistry. When I was little, I wanted to become a pharmacist because my mum used to sell drugs. When I grew up and realized that pharmacy was much more than selling drugs, my passion for it increased. However, when I got to senior secondary school class 2 and did well-rounded research on courses available in the sciences, I was drawn to Chemical Engineering. My plan to escape writing Biology in JAMB contributed to this decision. However, I became more interested in Chemical Engineering and since I didn’t get admitted into a federal university, I opted for Industrial Chemistry at Wesley with plans to further in Chemical Engineering.

GBA: What CGPA did you graduate with?

Guest: I graduated with a CGPA of 3.97 on a 4.00 scale.

GBA: How do you feel about that?

Guest: I’m excited about it. I’m glad the hard work and determination paid off.

Jesugbogo Enis

GBA: So you are the best graduating student, have you always known that you would be the one?

Guest: No, I didn’t know. Although some people have always believed that it would be me, I would not have been surprised if it wasn’t because the competition in my set was quite tight. When I first got admitted to Wesley, I had no plans of being the overall best graduating student. All I wanted was to have a First Class. I only got inspired after attending a convocation ceremony back then. I watched as the best graduating student gave his speech, and that was my first motivation. I wrote it down as a goal and started actively working toward it.

GBA: Can you describe your experience in Wesley in a few words?

There were good times and bad times as well. I remember now the sleepless nights, times I spent in the lab and library, times I intentionally starved myself of food so I could save money, times I cried due to frustration, times of prayers and fellowship and so many memories.

I believe that my experiences at Wesley have shaped me to become the lady I am today For instance, I used to be very shy; some people don’t believe it when I say it, but it is true. Involving extracurricular activities, such as singing in the choir, helped build my confidence. The various presentations we had also helped me. Generally, I’m grateful for all my lecturers, friends, mates, and everyone else I came across at Wesley.

GBA: Have there been times you got attracted to guys during your stay in Wesley?

Guest: *blushes* Yes, of course, there have been times. Quite a number of them actually, but I always tried to keep focused, and believe me when I say, it wasn’t always easy.

GBA: How did you balance your academics with social and spiritual activities?

Guest: A better word to use will be that I learnt to integrate it. I didn’t always have it perfect, but I tried to do what was important at a certain time. If I had to be in the chapel, then you would find me there. If I had to read, then I’d be reading and if I needed to take a break and relate to people, I’d do that. I also learnt to manage my time so I could make up for time spent in the chapel and other activities. You just have to find what works for you.

GBA: How did you manage your time?

Guest: I managed my time by avoiding procrastination. I also managed my time by utilizing the little time I had left after spiritual or social activities to rest or study. Honestly, you couldn’t just see me everywhere. In school, I did not have the luxury of having time for gists or chats because spiritual and extracurricular activities took all that time, so I really had to utilize the time I had left, and that is what I did.

GBA: What are some of the reading techniques you employ in reading?  

Guest:

1. I read as often as possible. I do not wait until the examination period before I start reading. I rest more during the exam.

2. I do my assignment myself. This way I can research until I understand it.

3. Another one is that I employ the Pomodoro technique, which is the act of recalling after reading. I can do this by setting questions for myself to answer or asking a friend to ask me questions.

4. I take notes when reading.

5. I commit my academics to God. Yes, this is also a technique for me. I pray.

GBA: What is the secret behind your academic success?

Guest: The secret behind my academic success is God. It may sound conventional when people say it but for me, it really is God. I always tell people that when I was in secondary school, chemistry was an issue for me—the same Chemistry I ended up studying. I failed Chemistry in my G.C.E. exam just because I did not understand it; I struggled with it in SS 2. I kept reading it even though I didn’t understand it and cried to God for understanding. It’s a testimony that understanding came and I was able to perform well in my WAEC and had the confidence to study it in the tertiary institution. So for me, God is the secret.

I am also hardworking and don’t give up easily. I trY my best so that if I have any reason to give up, I’d know that I have done everything possible.

GBA: What are your plans?

Guest: My plans include learning new things, taking on new tasks, and very likely, attaining a degree in Chemical Engineering or a closely related field.

GBA: What tips can you give to other students out there?

Guest: Believe in yourself — as I mentioned in my speech, if I could do it, you can do it too. It’s not impossible, after all, I don’t have thirty heads. I am not saying that you must be the best graduating student; all I’m saying is that you can perform well and have the kind of grade you will be proud of. Once you are proud of your grade, first-class, second-class upper, or lower, then you are good to go.

GBA: What can you say about the educational system in Nigeria?

Guest: There is a lot to say. The educational system in Nigeria is flawed and does not encourage students to study or stay in school, but, as I always like to say rather than be part of the problem, I prefer to be a problem solver. Keep hope alive and do what needs to be done, eventually, it’ll become a testimony.

GBA: Now that you have graduated from school, when should we expect a wedding bell?

Guest: *laughs* A wedding bell is not ringing anytime soon. I might have an answer for you in another 4-5 years. Thank you very much.

GBA: Thank you, Jesugbogo.

That’s it, readers. Success is sweet, but the secret is sweat. Are there lessons you’ve learnt from this, please drop them in the comment section.

10 thoughts on “I wanted to become a Pharmacist – Jesugbogo Enis”

  1. A fascinating discussion is definitely worth comment. I do think that you ought to publish more about this topic, it may not be a taboo subject but typically people dont speak about such issues. To the next! Many thanks!!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.